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Strings
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Orchestral Strings

Cello:

We have many varieties of cello strings for sale. Cello strings are available in one of three tensions: light, medium and heavy, with medium being the standard. Many high quality bowed instrument strings come from Germany and Austria, and are labeled in German. The German equivalents to the English tension terms are: weich/light, mittel/medium and stark/heavy. Most players find that medium tension strings work well for their needs. If you need strings that are easier to finger, and are willing to accept less volume, light tension cello string sets might be a good choice for you. If instead, you are not concerned with ease of playability, and are mainly interested in getting the maximum possible projection and volume from your instrument, you may wish to try heavy tension strings. Cello strings are also available in several lengths. Standard cellos are full or 4/4 size. Student model cello strings are available for smaller cellos in 1/8, , , sizes.

Double Bass:

The double bass is the largest member of the orchestral string family. Double bass strings are tuned E, A, D & G. There are some five string instruments; these are tuned B, E, A, D & G. There is no standard size for the double bass, but the most common instruments are size, and have a body about 115 cm long. A full size bass, which is much less common, has a body about 140 cm long. Although double bass string sets are often described as steel, nylon, Perlon (a brand name of nylon synthetic), and gut, they are, with a few exceptions, always wound with metal. Most double bass strings, made by most manufacturers are wound with metal. They can be wound with: aluminum, chrome, nickel, silver, or tungsten. Each of the various winding metals provides a different sort of tone. La Bella makes some special sets that are wound with nylon and nylon tape. These sets are suitable for pizzicato (finger style) playing such as in bluegrass or rockabilly settings and may not respond well to bowing.

Viola:

Our viola string selection includes one of three tensions: light, medium and heavy, with medium being the standard. Many high quality bowed instrument strings come from Germany and Austria, and are labeled in German. The German equivalents to the English tension terms are: weich/light, mittel/medium and stark/heavy. Most players find that medium tension strings work well for their needs. If you need strings that are easier to finger, and are willing to accept less volume, a light tension viola string set might be a good choice for you. If instead, you are not concerned with ease of playability, and are mainly interested in getting the maximum possible projection and volume from your instrument, you may wish to try heavy tension strings. Viola strings are also available in several lengths. Standard violas are "full" or 4/4 size, which is about 16 inches. Student model viola strings are available for smaller violas in and sizes. Violas are available in many more sizes than the violin. There are 11, 12, 13, 14, 14.5, 15, 15.5, 16, 16.5 and 17 inch violas (measured as the length of the back of the body, not including the neck).As such; many different sizes of viola strings are available to fit both student and extra long models. It is possible to buy a single viola string; we carry single strings from most manufacturers.

Violin:

Sets of violin strings are available to fit many sizes of violin. A standard violin is 4/4 size. Common fractional sizes are 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, and . We have a substantial fractional size violin string selection, and carry all of the above sizes. If the description of a set of violin strings does not specifically state that it is not 4/4 size, it is usually safe to assume that it is 4/4 size. Smaller sizes will have clear descriptions of their size. Until recently, violin strings were made of gut. In the 18th century, violinists began to use G strings wound with metal wire in order to improve their tone. Gradually, people began to use wound D and A strings too. Each violin string had a core of gut, and the E string was still usually all gut. This continued until the mid 20th century, when new developments in string making technology allowed the use of nylon core and steel strings. Now most players use nylon or steel core violin strings, with the G, D, and A being wound with metal and the E usually being plain steel, which is far more durable than gut as well as possessing a clearer tone. At Just Strings, we have a wide variety of violin strings for sale.
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